New Aluminum based battery from MIT suggests low cost, fast charging, low-fire risk battery feasible in short term

New Aluminum based battery from MIT suggests low cost, fast charging, low-fire risk battery feasible in short term

https://reddit.com/r/electricvehicles/comments/wxnog7/new_aluminum_based_battery_from_mit_suggests_low/
pithy_pun
https://www.reddit.com/r/electricvehicles/comments/wxnog7/new_aluminum_based_battery_from_mit_suggests_low/


Primary paper:

[https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04983-9](https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04983-9)

Ars writeup:

[https://arstechnica.com/science/2022/08/new-aluminum-sulfur-battery-tech-offers-full-charging-in-under-a-minute/](https://arstechnica.com/science/2022/08/new-aluminum-sulfur-battery-tech-offers-full-charging-in-under-a-minute/)

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Main cell chemistry is NaCl/KCl/AlCl3, which is all cheap to source in an ethical manner. Main downside is a very high operating temperature. But I think either a next version of the chemistry or better thermal housing systems could be developed more easily than fixing all the sourcing issues around Li ion batteries, esp NCM based chemistries.

In either case, this underscores why not to believe the FUD around how we’ll never be able to make enough batteries for EVs. Stuff like this seems to around the corner to fill in the edge cases as they arise.



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4 thoughts on “New Aluminum based battery from MIT suggests low cost, fast charging, low-fire risk battery feasible in short term

  1. I read this a couple of days ago and my first thought was if this chemistry doesn’t have any fatal flaws and can be scaled up it would be ideal for grid storage. They will be inexpensive, size really is irrelevant in a fixed location and keeping them at 90° C would be trivial.

  2. >Stuff like this seems to around the corner to fill in the edge cases as they arise.

    While I agree that there is no cause for alarm as to whether we can build enough batteries I’m gonna throw a bit of water on the parade. There’s a reason that Lithium ion batteries (developed in the 90’s) were only now adopted for use in cars. You need to know how batteries behave as they age. Do they fail? And if so – how? (do they become a fire risk, etc)

    This knowledge is only available after basically waiting. You can’t simulate this or test this in ‘aging chambers’ to any great certainty. So any new chemistry that is just in the lab right now isn’t going to make it into EVs well past the time when the changeover to a large percentage of cars being EVs on the road having already happened.

    There’s plenty of lithium out there. Sodium ion batteries are also already mature enough to be in low spec cars.

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