will my garage switch board handle a 32amp EVSE? Electrician promised to get back to me about it but still hasnt after nearly a week.

will my garage switch board handle a 32amp EVSE? Electrician promised to get back to me about it but still hasnt after nearly a week.

https://reddit.com/r/electricvehicles/comments/wxjn9g/will_my_garage_switch_board_handle_a_32amp_evse/
rebbrov
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will my garage switch board handle a 32amp EVSE? Electrician promised to get back to me about it but still hasnt after nearly a week.



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3 thoughts on “will my garage switch board handle a 32amp EVSE? Electrician promised to get back to me about it but still hasnt after nearly a week.

  1. what an amazing label. power. on a circuit board. same electrician as the one who isn’t getting back to you?

    If those things labeled power are outlets, your code might stipulate that it takes 25%-50% rating. lights will be different. You could be looking at 0.8×63 > 0.25x(20+16+10) + 0.75(32) but thats pretty local code, and my breakers don’t look like your breakers!

    But electricians get money for doing work like this.

  2. Looks Aussie (from the 90s), so we rate cables and then install breakers to suit the cable installation derating factors, eg partially enclosed in thermal insulation for 2.5mm² is 16 amps.

    The 63 is an isolation switch, not a current limiting breaker, so we can’t make assumptions on that one. The 20, 16, 10 are thermal magnetic breakers only, not RCD/GFCI, and we can’t just add up to say the submains are good for 46amps.

    I reckon you need to
    – Step 1: get a competent electrical contractor to do a single line diagram, including mains size and submains size.
    – Step 2: Then confirm that the retailer is ok with the increase in load (* duty cycle, which for charging an EV might just be 100%), and
    – Step 3: if appropriate make an application for increase in demand.

    It will probably be within the 80a single phase or 63a three phase you already have, so it may just need step 1. I reckon your detached garage has 6mm² submains. So changing the 63a isolator to a 40a current limiting breaker might make the addition of a 32a circuit become compliant.

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